Arcticterntalk.org

The blog of a travelling psychiatrist and football lover. Who happens to be a halfway decent photographer. Takes a cynical view of the world

Archive for the tag “egyptian goose”

Early Arrival of Egyptian Goose Goslings 2016


Winter 2015-16 has been a strange one with varying temperatures almost daily. Painshill park in Cobham has always been home to many types of ducks and fowl including Egyptian Geese.

Egyptian Goose and Goslings .Painshill Park in Cobham. Copyright Chris Bushe 2016

Egyptian Goose and Goslings .Painshill Park in Cobham. Copyright Chris Bushe 2016

A few facts worth knowing about them are that they are not actually geese at all but a cross between a goose and a duck. It has many duck-like characteristics, but it also has some external goose-like traits. It is the most widespread of all the African waterfowl. These old-world shelducks were domesticated by the ancient Egyptians, and were considered sacred , and appeared in much of their artwork. The Romans and the Greeks also kept Egyptian Geese in domestic flocks.They can breed all  year around, but usually breed in the spring or at the end of a dry season. It thus is somewhat surprising to see baby goslings in early February.The British population dates back to the 18th century, though only formally added to the British list in 1971 and are found mainly in East Anglia, in parkland with lakes. It was officially declared a pest in the U.K. in 2009. There is little surprise that Painshill Park has become home to them over very many years.

Egyptian Goose and Goslings .Painshill Park in Cobham. Copyright Chris Bushe 2016

Egyptian Goose and Goslings .Painshill Park in Cobham. Copyright Chris Bushe 2016

 

Egyptian Goose and Goslings .Painshill Park in Cobham. Copyright Chris Bushe 2016

Egyptian Goose and Goslings .Painshill Park in Cobham. Copyright Chris Bushe 2016

Egyptian Goose and Goslings .Painshill Park in Cobham. Copyright Chris Bushe 2016

Egyptian Goose and Goslings .Painshill Park in Cobham. Copyright Chris Bushe 2016

 

 

The Animals of Farthing Wood go down to Painshill Park Cobham


A grey day but some of the creatures came out to play

A grebe and a fish

A goose with a wish

A ruined abbey at the end of the day

A swan who dribbles

A goose what quibbles

And a fish that had had its say

IMG_7254 IMG_7258 IMG_7283n IMG_7259y Ruinded Abbey At Night copy Ruinded Abbey At Night IMG_7253

Dead Fox was not what we expected to find


A sunday afternoon in the rain in Beddington Park Croydon. The aim was getting a motorised boat to work on one of the rivers that runs through. However one is taught that it is important to look out for obstructions such as reeds, sandbanks and now it seems dead foxes. Quite near the edge there was what looked like a young fox, dead in the water almost submerged. The other inhabitants of the park included some noisy herons who refused my kind invitations to sit still at the top of their tree and stop sqwarking so i might humbly photograph them. Egyptian geese that sat in the water surrounded by various debris from croydon, plastic water bottles etc.

Dead Fox below the water

Wisley RHS Gardens Surrey


A grey sort of day with little to do, so a walk was in order at Wisley. Not many flowers and plants to report but I did learn something about Geese who seemingly have broken wings. We used to see an Egyptian goose at Painshill park for 3-4 years who had what we thought was a deformed wing but it seems this is called ” angel wing or aeroplane wing”. they are born with this, cannot fly but survive about the same as normal geese.  A little poster in a Hide at Wisley taught me this! Our Egyptian Goose was named Mangle by my son, who had little interest in the biology of ducks.

Wisley is actually a great place for a walk, no-one has to be an expert on plants to enjoy the scenery there, though a fair amount of puffing and huffing and pontificating does go on.

An Egyptian goose with normal wings

 

Mangle. The goose with Angel Wing it seems

 

Angel wing Defined

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